in-class exercise (action)

To prepare for project #2, perform this quick exercise to get warmed up:

After receiving a set of instructions from Yoko Ono’s Grapefruit, perform the actions on campus during class time. Write about your experience of performing the actions and of any public response you observed during your performance on your blog. Also include any applicable documentation (images, videos, drawings, etc.) in your post. Use this exercise as a warm-up before beginning PROJECT #2—push yourself out of your comfort zone and question the parameters of how art is made. Can you make art with your body? Complete as many actions as you have time for in class on Monday 02/12.

Advertisements

project #2 [performance]

DUE DATE / CRITIQUE: Wednesday 02/21 + Monday 02/26 in Gallery 199

PROJECT TITLE: Performance

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Using yourself as your medium, create a performance piece with the subject matter of your choosing, using one of these three categories as your form…

  • HAPPENING (shake up “the norm” in a public space; interactive, relies heavily on audience)
  • ENDURANCE (test your limits in some way; challenges determination, patience, etc.)
  • PROCESS (perform the process of doing/creating something [not creating another artwork] from start to finish; reveals the creative process, obstacles, and creative solutions)

All performances must be performed live during critique in Gallery 199. Everyone will sign up for a critique slot today in class so you can bring in any materials you will need.

Your performance may be a collaborative effort with other members of your class, based on my approval.

In performance, the elements and principles of design are altered. Instead of shape, line, texture, etc. you are dealing in the realm of location, lighting, costuming, props, duration, etc. Pay attention to every detail—the choice of what you wear or how you act are what conveys meaning to your audience. Everything is a tool to communicate!

Although you are using yourself in some way (your body, your voice, etc) your own safety or the safety of others should never be challenged.

AS YOU PLAN YOUR PERFORMANCE, CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING:

  • How can you use your body as a tool for making art?
  • Is your performance scripted or improvised based on outside elements?
  • How do elements physical elements affect the meaning behind your piece?
  • Do you want your audience to be involved in the performance or to observe from a distance?
  • How do you want your audience to feel? What do you want them to think about?

DIGITAL SKETCHBOOK REQUIREMENTS: As you work on your projects, post the following on your blog prior to critique…

  • in-class exercise
  • project ideation (a paragraph about your ideas and conceptual goals before you begin work, research, sketches, work-in-progress images, etc.)
  • self-critique (a paragraph evaluating your project against your goals, and noting areas for improvement)

OPEN STUDIO DAYS: Wednesday 02/14 and Monday 02/19 (come prepared to work!)

RELEVANT ARTISTS / LECTURE RECAP: Yoko Ono, Sophie Calle, Francis Alys, Jamie Isenstein, Allan Kaprow / 2Matthew Barney, Marina Abramovic

project #1 [intervention]

DUE DATE / CRITIQUE: Monday 02/05

PROJECT TITLE: Intervention

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Conceptualize and develop a temporary project for a public location outside of the classroom. Pulling influence from public art, street art, and earthworks, your project should be unexpected within the location and should conceptually deal with an issue or observation that directly relates to the location or community.

Consider how your action will intervene with your viewer’s everyday experience. Does the surprise of an unexpected artwork bring joy, disrupt the mundane, or raise awareness?

Your project may be interactive and prompt viewer participation.

For critique, you may bring in documentation, or take us to a nearby location to view the work.

EXAMPLES: Possible approaches may include, but are not limited to…

  • an art object masquerading as an everyday object (e.g. a subversive ‘zine placed in a newsstand)
  • an “earthwork” (responding to the environment and manipulating nature)
  • guerrilla projection (temporary imagery on architecture)
  • stencil art, wheat pasting, stickering (e.g. manipulating bus stop advertisements)
  • temporary sculpture (e.g. an object left on the street for someone to find)
  • set the stage for a participatory work (let the community add to it over time)
  • etc.

DIGITAL SKETCHBOOK REQUIREMENTS: As you work on your projects, post the following on your blog prior to critique…

  • in-class exercise
  • project ideation (a paragraph about your ideas and conceptual goals before you begin work, research, sketches, work-in-progress images, etc.)
  • self-critique (a paragraph evaluating your project against your goals, and noting areas for improvement)

OPEN STUDIO DAYS: Monday 01/29 and Wednesday 01/31 (come prepared to work!)

RELEVANT ARTISTS / LECTURE RECAP: Gabriel OrozcoThe Yes Men, Barbara Kruger, Jenny HolzerSwoon + OlekRobert Smithson, Sarah Sze

 

in-class exercise (camouflage)

To prepare for project #1, perform this quick exercise to get warmed up:

Select a playing card and use this object as a way to intervene with the environment around campus. Think about placing it in a location where it would be camouflaged or would stand out. Modify its appearance if need be, and use its presence as a way to subvert the everyday. Document this mini “installation” and post a photo on to your blog. 

[As a reminder, in-class exercises are to experiment with new approaches and may be achieved quickly during class time. Projects are larger in scope and concept-driven, with open studio time devoted to their planning and completion. The emphasis of your production is placed on projects, but exercises are essential to learning.]

in-class exercise (laptop)

Following our discussion of The Function of the Studio (When the Studio is a Laptop), use the open studio time today to begin our first “mini” project.  Create one experimental work (an image, or sound, or video piece) by using the computer in front of you as a “raw tool.” Remember, a computer can be used just as intuitively as a paintbrush—just start mark making!

A big part of this assignment is that you avoid any traditional art-making programs such as Adobe CCS or freeware that is designed to produce artwork. Push the boundaries of what you think programs are meant to do and try to discover a new form. Be creative in your approach and don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Examples of possible approaches include:

  • screen grab imagery to the point of disintegration
  • create text art using Microsoft Word
  • webcam capture (think creatively about angle!)
  • Google poetry
  • website sound performance
  • glitch art

DUE DATE: Post your final piece to your blog for our mini critique at the beginning of next class, Wednesday 01/24.